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Posts tagged ‘Virginia Woolf’

A Room of One’s Own…..

My February’s selection for The Official 2018 TBR Pile Challenge was, A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf. I know I have mentioned this previously, but here is one author who actually intimidates me and as a result, I have not read one of the foremost, literary geniuses of 20th century! Back in 2016, I finally mustered up the courage to read To The Lighthouse which blew me away and I vowed to read more of Ms. Woolf’s works but it took me two more years to finally get to her writing again and this time as I went with one her most sought after non-fiction writings!

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I am not sure how other folks have written a synopsis of this amazing work, which says so much and yet cannot be captured in a 4 line summary! The essay kicks off as Ms. Woolf explores the subject on which she has been asked to provide a lecture on – Woman in Fiction! She asks what the title in itself means – women and what they like? Women and fiction they write or the fiction that is written about them or how all these three elements are intrinsically linked to each other! From here on, she goes to explore the writings by men on women and why women have not left money for their daughters to help them find a room of their own where they pursue their art? She draws out parallel’s in form of fictive sister of William Shakespeare who despite being equally imaginative and gifted may not have ever had a chance like her brother because of financial and social limitations which would have either driven her to an early death or confined her to the borderlines of society condemned as a mad woman! She then moves on to examine the history of Women writing from Aphra Behn to Jane Austen to Bronte Sisters to George Sand and her own contemporaries like Rebecca West who are often cast as undesirable beings because of their abilities and intellect! She show how small this history is and yet how one generation of women are indebted to her previous generation for the relative creative freedom, that she has received, because of the efforts of her predecessor! She also visits the fact that men authors often neglect the relationship between two women themselves unless it is in relation to a man! She closes her essay with asking more women to take up writing so that they are able to bequeath a better inheritance on their daughters than the one they received themselves!

To begin with, once again, I am not sure why I waited for ages, literally, to read this work. It would have been great to have appreciated the brilliance of the prose and deep and sometimes disquieting thoughts of this book much sooner than 2018! Anyhow, I am glad I finally did read this work and needless to say, have found so much to like about it! I know this has often be slotted under a feminist work, but I cannot help but think this is so much more. This book tells women, what they know but in way forcing them to see it in the glaring sunlight. It brings consciousness and awareness to women about their plight and the kind of legacy we have been handed down to what will hand down. What really stuck me is that while Ms. Woolf was very optimistic about the future of her daughter’s in a 100 years’ time; today, 100 years later, her essay is still relevant as ever. While we really do have more options, things have not changed much  – West was decried as an errant feminist because of her abilities. Today in our much evolved language a woman is called “bossy” if she displays initiative and ambition; while the very same qualities are applauded in man and shows him to be “hungry for success!” Goes to show the more things change, the more they remain the same. But more importantly, something that really spoke to me in contrast with other gender politics writing was its ending – there is no “down with men” war cry, but rather a strong push to women, to pull their lives up so that they can better their and their daughter’s lot!

100 years ago, Ms. Woolf exploded to give us so many things, and I know I will revisit again and again to take up one kernel and explore it end to end before moving on to another idea. One of best thought provoking books I have read in a very long time!

A big shout to Adam for hosting this great event, which finally giving a chance to read authors and books that I should have read long back and without this challenge would not have gotten to even now!

The End of February…..

The New Year is old and for me, time could not have flown fast enough! One of the most stressful months for me both professionally and personally, all I can say, good riddance! For the first time, I am glad to bid adieu to the winter, which brought more unpleasantness than acceptable and look forward to the new chapters of Summers; yes even hot Indian summers! As, always, I thank the powers that be for granting us books, that helped me tide over home-hospitals-sick dad-at-home-nurses-at-home-professional disappointments- home-job-doctor-job paradigm!

Thus, I bring you my February book wrap up, borrowing and combining from Helen’s monthly post of Commonplace Book post   and O’s ideas of  Wordless Wednesday  –

From The East of Eden by John Steinbeck –

But the Hebrew word, the word timshel—‘Thou mayest’— that gives a choice. It might be the most important word in the world. That says the way is open. That throws it right back on a man. For if ‘Thou mayest’—it is also true that ‘Thou mayest not.”

From A Room of One’s Own by Virginia Woolf

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well! “

From Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

If to live in his style is to eccentric, it must be confessed, that this something good in eccentricity

From Harry Heathcote of Gangoil by Anthony Trollope

What does a man live for except to alter things? When a man clear the forest and sows corns, does he not alter things?

From The Dairy of a Nobody by George Grossmith

What’s the good of a home, if you are never in it?

That was my reading for the month of February. I am immensely glad that despite all the chaos, I was able to stick to my only Reading Challenge of the year – The Official 2018 TBR Pile Challenge  and complete A Room of One’s Own as planned for the month, though I still need to post the review. In fact, I need to blog way more! Here’s hoping March brings in that much needed relief to one and all……

 

A View from the Tent…

I am a big fan of Huffpost Books listings/recommendations, therefore it was only natural that when they twitted about 10 Absolutely Incredible Historical Women, I would sit up and scan through it, for the next set of my must reads. While the list documented some  traditional heroines like Hester Prynne in The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Sethe in Beloved by Toni Morrison, there were also some interesting choices like Orlando by Virginia Woolf (I mean Orlando becomes a boy half way through the novel!!!). However the one book that for sure got my attention was “The Red Tent” by Anita Diamant and its protagonist Dinah. I mean the book was historical fiction, set in ancient Cannon (Remember my Masters was in Middle Eastern Studies) and it’s narrated by a Jacob’s daughter – Dinnah. Huffpost Books when synopsizing the book stated “To call it provocative and rebellious is an understatement; it pushes against patriarchy and suggests an ancient and empowering role for women and women’s sexuality.” I had to get the book!

The book as I previously mentioned is a first person narration by Dinnah, daughter of Jacob, great-granddaughter to Abraham, of the first covenant with God fame. The book begins with the story of Dinnah’s mother and aunts, Leah, Rachel, Zilpah and Biliah and their marriage to Jacob. It follows the well documented story of Jacob who worked for 14 years as a slave for Laban so that he could marry Leah and Rachel and the birth of Jacob’s sons and his only daughter – Dinnah. Dinnah describes her childhood as the only girl and her early initiation into the Red Tent where the women spent their 3 days during their menstrual cycle and her closeness with Joseph, Rachel’s son. The narration follows Jacob’s decision to leave Laban’s patriarchy and to make peace with his brother Esau before finally settling on the outskirts of Shechem. In Shechem, Dinnah who had begun assisting her aunt Rachel is summoned to the palace to help in the birth of the new baby by the King’s most recent concubine. In a departure from the Bible which spoke about “defiling” of Dinnah, Dinna talks of her falling in love with the Prince of Shechem and consenting to spend the night with him and agreeing to becoming his bride. This action leads to tumultuous results, including the murder of her husband and all the men of Shechem by Simon and Levi, her brothers, her escape into Egypt and the birth of her son, of finally finding peace and settling down with Bian the carpenter and travelling back to see a dying Jacob, under the protection of Joseph, who is now the Vizier of Egypt, after being sold to slavery by his brothers.

Now for the review – The book begins very well – Dinnah speaks of how a daughter must always talk about the mother to better explain her own history. She also mentions about her fleeting refernce in Bible- her being “defiled” and the vengeance wrecked by her brothers and how that is not the complete or the true story. It grips you right at the start and forces a reader to read on. But I think that is where the promise of the book ends.  While the descriptions of the ancient land are both accurate and well researched, I have to yet find the reason for naming it the “The Red Tent” – the book proposes liberation of women during their menstrual cycle which intrinsically is supposed to mark independence and rebellion for women from patriarchy; but I did not think that the author really emphasized on this spiritual aspect as much as the physical details, which we all could have been well spared off! Nor is the passing of the red tent and its ritual which metaphorically and may in actuality mark the end of liberty that women in pre-modern world enjoyed clearly delineated or expressed. The author talks of Jacob’s growing dislike of the red tent as well how the daughters in law of Leah and Rachel refused to follow the rituals of the red tent, but that is in passing; the reader is left to make or not make his or her own inferences. I felt that the significance of the red tent and the fact that it stood for rebellion and independence from a male dominated society was lost, especially by the end of the book, when we went to Egypt and saw the reconciliation between Dinnah and Joseph etc. Not that the entire book is bad – the characters of Leah, Rachel, Zilaph and Biliah are really well-rounded and their kindness, jealousy and humanity, all of which comes through very well in the narration, making them real and extremely likable. I did not understand Rebecca’s arrogance – I am not a Biblical scholar but I never thought of Rebecca as arrogant. Jacob’s character again I felt was weak, but that’s something I felt even when reading the Bible. My main disappointment was again with Dinnah’s character – she seems to be constantly dependent on others for her fate – the only empowering action was to marry the Prince of Shechem. While I know that historically in patriarchies, women fundamentally had little if any choices, but this is a work of fiction and all the while Dinnah whose voice the novel purports to give stands quietly either because she is scared or in awe or is too enraged. She does not speak!!! She simply narrates and that to my mind is not a sign of empowerment!

Read it as you may feel differently. Again the book had several promises, but they simply did not get fulfilled!

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