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The Spinning Story

I know, I know, the path to hell is paved with good intentions! 2019 was supposed to be the year, I read more and post more! In fact in spirit of unrivaled ambition and complete disassociation from reality, I chose a 100 books as a Reading Goal on my Good Reads. Half a year has since passed by and I am so behind, that the word “catch -up” is something that can only tickle my funny bone!

In a year of dismal reading record, the one thing that I am proud of is that I was able to participate in the 20th Classic Club Spin Read and what’s more, surprise, surprise, I was able to complete my spin book well within the timelines; though the blog post, as usual is late! I had a very “Quixotic” list this year and I cannot honestly say, I was looking forward with enthusiasm. However, the spin number turned out to be a good number and I got James Michener’s Pulitzer Prize winning classic – Tales of the South Pacific as my Spin book.

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Tales of South Pacific is a series of short stories or novellas, related with a character or an event and was published in 1947. The stories were based on Michener’s own World War II experience in the South Pacific and the stories are all fiction, steeped in real life events, based on the author’s observation and experience during his stay there. The stories deal with a variety of aspects that the US armed forces stationed in the island had to deal with – from the harsh realities of war, where death is inevitable and expected to the emotional aspects, of loves found and lost and friendships that survive the worst possible tests! The Cave , is a description of an action that happened in islands and where US Navy triumphed with of an English informer who infiltrated into the heart of Japanese military base and was later caught and killed. Mutiny traces the lives of the descendants of the infamous, Mutiny on HMS Bounty and their effort to save the natural habitat of the islands from the US Navy as the latter try and build a landing strip for the aircrafts that was vital for the success of the war in the region. An Officer and a Gentleman, looks at the loneliness and emotional desert that some of the officers felt and the many ways that they tried to conquer it, not always in the best manner or conduct. Stories like The Heroine, Fo’ Dolla, and Those Who Fraternize are all love stories that takes on the questions of color, acceptance and challenging the set norm, in times when old prejudices were slowly being dismantled by a world that had gone of the hinge. There poignant tales of courage and valour like The Aristrip at Konora and the happy memories that help keep sailors hold on to reality, like Frisco.

I can understand, why the book won a Pulitzer. It gave a brutal, honest and somewhat emotional narrative of a war, from which the US and the World was just recovering. It challenged the set status quo of class and color and privileges and sang the songs of a new World Order, which the Dumbarton Oaks Conference was supposed to achieve in the form of United Nations.  This book is all of that and then some! This was Michener’s first book and the unique narrative style that he would pioneer over other novels, like The Source, Alaska and Texas, was put down in paper for the first time. Short stories linked with one event or character came into being in the Tales of South Pacific. But it is not just the narrative style and the subject which makes this book a great read, it is the characters whom he brings to life, with all their nobleness and frailty that captures the readers imagination and makes them relate to them, admire them and sometimes, disparage them as well. The author’s thorough understanding of the Military affairs and conduct, comes through in every story, bringing authenticity and history to act as strong pillars to the stories. The  author captures the tiny detail of the people, the heat, the lack of facilities and the make do efforts to bring some semblance of comfort in the harshest conditions, and makes for the very heart of the book! While not all stories are all at par, most are and the last few tales especially bring out the brilliance of the author as he captures, in a moving and heart-breaking style, the unnecessary loss of lives of good men and women, in a war that makes little sense! 

To end, I believe in later years, James Michener produced a much higher degree of fiction, especially in novels like Caravan and The Source. However, the Tales of South Pacific is a must read for an honest, authentic and powerful story of World War II

 

7 Comments Post a comment
  1. Oh, I’m glad this was a good book! I love short stories and have been meaning to read more about the Pacific theater, so I’ll keep this one on my radar. 🙂

    June 4, 2019
    • You should definitely try this one Marian! Its very good!

      June 4, 2019
  2. mudpuddle #

    i read a lot of Michener at one time, but that’s receded into the age of the dinosaurs… i’ll reread this if i get a minute; i always liked the way M wrote; i understand that some of his later works weren’t as good, but maybe i’ll get busy and find out for myself… fine post, tx…

    June 4, 2019
    • Thank You for your kind words! Yes, Michener is a bit unpredictable, he writes Caravan and blows you away and then he writes Sayonara and you are left wondering if this is the same author! But this one is a true Michener, so I hope you enjoy it!

      June 5, 2019
  3. I’ve read The Source and Centennial in years gone by and I can sing ‘wash that man right out of my hair’ thanks to the musical version of South Pacific, but I’ve never tried to read it. Didn’t realse it was Michener’s first book either – thanks for sharing.
    And hope the second half of your reading year is better than your first half 🙂

    June 5, 2019
  4. Good grief, look how late I am to the party. I’m going to stay away from Michener. I tried him once but honestly there are so many other books I want to read that I don’t have time for him. Sorry, James! 😀 And Pulitzer Prizes are not all that. I sometimes wonder if the prize is more political. In any case, I hope your next reading experience exceeds this one by at least 10!

    June 14, 2019
    • These prizes are political and cannot be wholly be trusted! But this was a good attempt and I feel Michener did attempt to say some important things which are still relevant today!

      June 24, 2019

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